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***** IMPORTANT INFORMATION! ******
Fusetron will be shut down over the next few weeks until we get resettled, post-move. We will still
be taking orders but keep in mind that there will be delays in responding to emails, outgoing shipments, etc,
so please be patient. Thanks.
***** IMPORTANT INFORMATION! ******

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Artist: KINBOTES
Title: s/t
Format: LP
Label: Slowboy
Country: Germany
Price: $26.00
Edition of 200 with tip-on covers and pasted-on silkscreen artwork. "Maybe the ultimate DIY lo-fi LP in rock history, putting Royal Trux, Sebadoh and all their 90s/2000s clones to shame. The recording and playing is crude and inept, but the songs all have clever lyrics and catchy melodies. The band is named after a character from Nabokovs "Pale Fire" who commits suicide at the end, an irony as tragically, one of the members later did so in real life. The opener, "I Love Rock N Roll", sets the tone with its scathing sarcasm about the (then) current state of rock music ("Today theres more talent in rock & roll todays singers sing about uplifting things." and "Dont you think that Prince is better than Little Richard; with that pompadour, he looks like LITTLE RICHARD.") The feedback-laden string-shredding guitar solo (if you dare call it that) beats out any other 80s/90s VU/Lou Reed wannabes. "Rock & roll is worse than (arbitrary or our material). Its excessive and it ruins songs!" The next song, "Hang Around", is a jaunty Kinks-influenced ramble with Ray Davies inflected vocals, and is as sloppy as anything the Davies Bros ever concocted. These two songs pretty much dictate the intended musical direction of the whole album - VU lo-fi sleaze melded with Kinkdom melodic sensibilities on the slower and less frenetic songs, though they are as lo-fi as the rockers. There is one other song worth singling out. A clumsy epitaph for Ian Curtis veers into a music hall chorus about "The King of Comedy". It has one of the more memorable attempts at rhyming ("Ian Curtis was a true original. His Jim Morrison influence was so subliminal.") as well as a genius fragmented attempt at a piano solo that literally runs out of gas after about 10 seconds. The cover is as lo-fi as the sounds it contains. A wraparound slick is pasted on so it covers the LP opening and must be slit open to remove the record. The primitive cartoon-like drawing of the band shown as a trio even though they were a duo - the third is a friend who is listed as a member - or is it really Charles Kinbote himself?" - Mike Ascherman.

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