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Artist: THOMAS JEFFERSON SLAVE APARTMENTS
Title: Burning Trash
Format: 7"
Label: Negative Guest List
Country: Australia
Price: $11.00
"Two unreleased tracks from THOMAS JEFFERSON SLAVE APARTMENTS, taken from a 95 demo (possibly funded by Dinosaur Mahaffey) that mostly featured tracks which would later appear on their second LP Straight to Video. B-side "Price of My Words" is described by RON HOUSE as an eggy version of "Lightnin Rod" from said record, while A-side is a woozy, entirely new, old hit sure to give you a hangover tomorrow." -Negative Guest List.
SOLD OUT

Artist: THOMAS JEFFERSON SLAVE APARTMENTS
Title: Negative Guest List
Format: 7"
Label: Siltbreeze
Country: USA
Price: $3.00
SOLD OUT

Artist: THOMAS JEFFERSON SLAVE APARTMENTS
Title: Straight to Video
Format: LP
Label: Straight to Video
Country: USA
Price: $15.00
“Formed in Columbus, OH in 1988; Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments first released a number of 7”s via Datapanik and Siltbreeze before eventually going on to sign in 1995 to Onion Records lead by Johan Kugelberg, an imprint of Rick Rubins American Recordings. After the eventual folding of Onion a few years later, Straight to Video – though promised to the defunct label, resurfaced as a CD only release in 1997 via Anyway Records. The title Straight to Video derives its name from the second-hand nature of being passed along to Anyway records by circumstance; as well as the crap-shack CD only format. Not only does this release mark its first release on vinyl, it presents a missing piece of underground music history. TJSA are best known for Ron Houses apt and acerbic lyrics; with an unparalled stage presence couched in first-wave CLE Punk; and guitarist Bob Petrics evident lifelong-obsession with classic rock meets dirt blooz fullstack-riffs.” - Straight to Video.

"It seems inconceivable now, but back in 91, foreseeing the impact of Nirvanas Nevermind on Americas underground music scene, or the subsequent feeding frenzy, was virtually impossible. Overzealous major-label A&R reps stalked this nations bars n basements for the next few years like ravenous chickens in pursuit of an elusive grasshopper they couldnt see but knew existed. It had to! Many alt-rock Orthopterida were snared, none of whose stridulations seemed to resonate in a manner deemed by the greedy as a prerequisite for sure-fire bankability, and thus the hunt continued. By 1995 an enterprising yardbird strutting his stuff for the Onion label (a division of Rick Rubins American Records) had pecked his way down the trail to Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments. And before you could say “Coq au Vin,” a deal was struck and their sneeringly great debut LP, Bait & Switch was (ostensibly) available for mainstream consumption from Caribou, Maine, to San Ysidro, California. How well it sold is a quandary to explore on a day far rainier than this, but it was chock full of the bands best numbers (at the time), an inexplicable Electric Eels cover, and a scabrous stab at the Rock & Hall Of Fame, which, predictably, garnered the most widespread attention. Whatever, something mustve been working, cause unlike their label peers (V-3 and Stiffs Inc.), TJSA turned in a follow-up long player, Straight To Video, and it was a hummer.
But Onion had other ideas, foremost of which was a quick vamoose into the ether of non-existence. The label shuttered its doors, and in one fell swoop, the band was paid for, then handed back, their effort. And so ended TJSAs brush in the bigs. Undaunted, they began the search for its next home, calling on labels such as Treble Kicker, Vinyl Communications, and Roadrunner, only to be ignored time and again. A pall of uncertainty loomed, with the fate of bands finest effort hanging in the balance, when suddenly, local label Anyway Records — flush from the proceeds of winning an Ohio State pie-eating contest — stepped forward to grant Straight To Video the mortality it so richly deserved (“mortality” being code for “CD only”). Fanfare was zero. Not even a press release. However, the distribution was solid enough, but to a person, every fan of Straight To Video would tell you it was meant for the grandeur of vinyl, not the cheap vacancy of a compact disc. As sophomore efforts go, the numbers that this is better than (J. Geils Bands The Morning After, for sure) far outweigh those it is not (Born In A Barn is a tough one to top). Ron Houses lyrics peak with his inimitable wit and wisdom, his delivery as rich as Chinese takeout for Sunday dinner. Guitarist Bob Petric tempers those pummeling, EVH-like power chords with soaring, uncanny Schenker-esque fluidity while the rhythm section of bassist Craig Dunson and drummer Ted Hattemer rudder this fucker with such precision, the best thing you can say about em is you almost dont even know theyre there.
Its taken almost 20 years for justice to find its mark, but Kellie Morgans Straight To Video, THE LABEL, has made it possible for Straight To Video, THE RECORD. So, to quoteth the bard (aka Ron House), “When the entertainment ends, thats when the fun begins.” So whaddaya say? Lets get this party started!" - Tom Lax (Ambatofinandrahana, Madagascar, 2015).

Artist: THOMAS JEFFERSON SLAVE APARTMENTS
Title: You Lookin For Treble?
Format: CD
Label: Year Zero
Country: USA
Price: $8.00
"Comprised of material recorded between 1989 and 1994, You Lookin for Treble? is the musical equivalent of Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments junior-high yearbook. A document of the bands early, occasionally awkward stages, the album is marked by lineup shifts (detailed in the liner notes) and the usual trappings of a new band trying to find its sound. Over the course of Treble?s 20 tracks, the band gels into an abrasive, yet danceable, noisy punk outfit (fittingly heavy on the treble all the way around) led by vocalist Ron House who was quite clearly trying to distance himself musically from his recently disbanded bouncy rock/new wave outfit Great Plains. With the rhythm section in an almost constant state of turnover, the bands sound is defined by Houses snide tirades and Bob Petricks nimble guitar work characterized by a winning balance of barred chords and false harmonics (also present in Petricks other first-rate outfit, Girly Machine). Of the songs included on You Lookin for Treble?, only one, "You Cant Kill Stupid," ever found its way on to a proper Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments studio effort (a cleaned up take appears on 1995s Bait & Switch), though several others can be found on the bands impossible-to-find early singles and their infamous promo-only 10", as well as various compilation records (at least half a dozen of the songs are available on volumes one and two of Datapanik Records Greatest Hits). You Lookin for Treble? serves nicely as the missing link between Houses exit from Great Plains and Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments 1995 major-label debut, Bait & Switch, on the American/Onion imprint." - AllMusic. Sorta tough to find, not very well distributed, 1997 release from Ron House and crew. 500 pressed.

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