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Staalplaat

MUSLIMGAUZE - Deceiver Vol. 3 & 4

"The original 2CD Deceiver from 1996 is a seminal release in Bryn Jones' sprawling discography, one of the first major ones to really pivot into the noisier/more abrasive side of Jones' sound as Muslimgauze. From its epic, vinyl-side-long title-track down to terse, rhythmic snippets like "A Parsee View," Deceiver set out many of the avenues that Muslimgauze would continue to explore before Jones' death in 1999. Since then, Staalplaat has continued to release the massive back-log of Jones' work, with the nine-disc set Box of Silk and Dogs seeing the release of a third volume of Deceiver. Now, for the first time, that third volume gets a standalone release, paired with the last of the Deceiver tapes. From the brutally curtailed loops and distorted beats of "100 Great Turks" to the hypnotically layered percussion and voice duet of "Opulent Baku Cube," to the oddly funky broken beat of "Maharajaganjinna," volume 3 of Deceiver remains an essential listen, one that time has only rendered more contemporary. On this two-disc reissue it is accompanied by the 11 unused remixes that make up Deceiver vol. 4. The second disc here features several intriguing shorter mixes of "Deceiver" itself that emphasize different sides of the track's sound, as well as several other mixes that take Jones' sound in fascinating new directions. The burbling fourth mix sounds like nothing less than the cousin of some of Astral Social Club's friendlier material, and several tracks such as the seventh mix are so quiet and patient they're the closest Muslimgauze ever came to ambient music. The combination makes for a fitting companion to the original Deceiver and a surprisingly good introduction to Jones' work: volume 3 boasts some stellar examples of one of Jones' primary styles as Muslimgauze, and volume 4 gives the curious listener some idea of just how wide-ranging his work could be. Muslimgauze archive series volume twelve. Limited edition of 500." - Staalplaat .
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  • Regular price $27.00


After nearly a decade of false starts, multiple game plans veering off the rails, and a handful of shattered hopes and/or dreams, the odyssey is finally complete—the new Fusetron site is here.

This is the first phase of a multipart rollout that will span the next few months: the currently browsable stock includes miscellaneous new releases from the past 8+ months (we have a lot of catching up to do), plus approximately a third of our backstock. Note that we’ve reduced/slashed prices on many titles and will continue to do so in order to make room for new stock. We’ll also be expanding / tweaking / improving / debugging the site itself (for example, we still have work to do on the automated international postage system, not to mention the inevitable inventory discrepancies that come with transferring an ancient and massive database to a new system).

Over the next few months, as we take inventory, clean house, and delve into our storage, we will be uploading thousands of additional items, gradually, on a near-daily basis. This will include the majority of the LPs, as well as many titles, in all formats, once thought long-gone. Many currently “sold out” items are likely to resurface.

Finally, once our general backstock is up (probably in the next two or three months) we’ll begin making our extensive stockpile of rarities available online for the first time: tons of random out-of-print titles, "deadstock," warehouse finds, secondhand collectibles, etc., accumulated over the past few decades.

Frequent/returning customers will be getting early access to these items. Details to follow on how this will work (a priority mailing list? a 'frequent flyer'-like program?), but it will not be based on dollars spent. We want to reward those who consistently support us, especially in the discogs marketplace era (to those who show up trying to poach five copies of a one-off rarity, and nothing else, ever… ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ ).

So—we suggest you take some time to dig through the site—even we’ve been surprised by what’s been turning up, and there’s much more to come.
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