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Korm Plastics

DE WAARD, FRANS - This Is Supposed to Be a Record Label

Second, expanded softcover edition. "In 1984 Frans de Waard started his own band, Kapotte Muziek, and his own cassette label, Korm Plastics. A few years later, in 1992, he was asked to work for Staalplaat, then one of the biggest independent labels for experimental and electronic music. Staalplaat was the home for bands like Muslimgauze, :zoviet*france:, Rapoon, O Yuki Conjugate as well as Jaap Blonk, Normally Invisible and Kingdom Scum. With an average of three new releases every month, Staalplaat remained a major player for the next eleven years. Frans was hired to set-up a database and to sell and buy new music, but over the years also assumed a role as (unofficial) business director and A&R man, and came to be regarded as the head honcho. In 2003 he’d had enough and decided to quit.

This book tells about those eleven years from his own perspective, the many highs and as many lows of working for a small independent record label, which also functioned as a shop, mail order, radio programme, news outlet, and concert organiser. It’s about embarrassing confrontations with musicians, labels, distributors, and the disproportionate expenses they had because they wanted to have their own style of CD packaging…

This book is not about the 1980s when Staalplaat was part of the local squatter movement or their post-2000 activities in Berlin. This is Frans’ personal account from within, when Staalplaat was riding its biggest wave in the 1990s.

It includes various appendices, such as an interview with Staalplaat founder Geert-Jan Hobijn, a transcript of a radio interview with Muslimgauze, a 1980s account of Staalplaat’s activities, a discography, and more.

There are no images of artists or album covers; instead you can feast your eyes on some never-before-seen, behind-the scenes photos taken in the office, shop and warehouse.

This book will appeal to everyone with an interest in the experimental music scene, and anyone else who wants to read a crazy, funny and sad story about a small struggling record label. Knowledge of the music is not required, but you will surely be inclined to look it up while or after reading this. Anyone who is interested in a manual of how (not) to run your record label might want to take notes. Edited by Mark Poysden, book design Alfred Boland. Cover Art by dutch comics artist Erik Kriek. Published in 2016." - Korm Plastics.

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After nearly a decade of false starts, multiple game plans veering off the rails, and a handful of shattered hopes and/or dreams, the odyssey is finally complete—the new Fusetron site is here.

This is the first phase of a multipart rollout that will span the next few months: the currently browsable stock includes miscellaneous new releases from the past 8+ months (we have a lot of catching up to do), plus approximately a third of our backstock. Note that we’ve reduced/slashed prices on many titles and will continue to do so in order to make room for new stock. We’ll also be expanding / tweaking / improving / debugging the site itself (for example, we still have work to do on the automated international postage system, not to mention the inevitable inventory discrepancies that come with transferring an ancient and massive database to a new system).

Over the next few months, as we take inventory, clean house, and delve into our storage, we will be uploading thousands of additional items, gradually, on a near-daily basis. This will include the majority of the LPs, as well as many titles, in all formats, once thought long-gone. Many currently “sold out” items are likely to resurface.

Finally, once our general backstock is up (probably in the next two or three months) we’ll begin making our extensive stockpile of rarities available online for the first time: tons of random out-of-print titles, "deadstock," warehouse finds, secondhand collectibles, etc., accumulated over the past few decades.

Frequent/returning customers will be getting early access to these items. Details to follow on how this will work (a priority mailing list? a 'frequent flyer'-like program?), but it will not be based on dollars spent. We want to reward those who consistently support us, especially in the discogs marketplace era (to those who show up trying to poach five copies of a one-off rarity, and nothing else, ever… ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ ).

So—we suggest you take some time to dig through the site—even we’ve been surprised by what’s been turning up, and there’s much more to come.
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