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Ravi

PRINTS OF DARKNESS - Zindabad

"Raw, exciting and really quite excellent... fans of fuzz will find a feast of it on this set. The Prints turn in enjoyable readings of Summertime, Morning Dew, and Country Joe & the Fishs Rock and Soul Music, but its their original numbers that really stand out‚Ķ The bands bottled-up creative energy comes bursting to a head on the culminating number, Oh Color the Shadowy Distance, which starts out as an _ºber-dramatic Doors-in-the-garage exercise atop a Tobacco Road-type stomp riff, before levitating into a psychedelic instrumental section that sounds a bit like Jorma Kaukonen jamming with the Velvet Underground. Thrilling stuff." ‚ÄîMike Stax, Ugly Things.

\r\n\r\n"This is the story of a sixties garage band‚Ķ only this one was based in Lahore, West Pakistan, where there was a small American community and a funky school in an old British Raj-era bungalow. September 1967: Skip Boyce had a drum kit assembled from various shops in Penang during a family vacation and Danny Carr had a Framus bass and a huge amp. Lets start a band! New kid Steve Davy provided the missing link. Add his psychedelic Hofner guitar and small amp and the Great Flower Famine was born. "Lets just play songs with three chords (Gloria, Louie Louie and For Your Love were the first three); more followed: Stones, Animals, Kinks, Doors. Old friend Travis "Smokey" Henderson was in the States, but returned to Lahore and joined as lead guitarist. John Sligh was added as lead singer because he liked the same tunes the others did and looked cool. By the end of the school year, the Famine was a tight unit‚Äîthe best rock band in West Pakistan. September 1968: a years worth of new music, and new influences‚ÄîHendrix, Led Zeppelin, the San Francisco groups. Meanwhile, Steve bought a Hofner violin bass like Paul McCartney, Skip returned from the States with a full set of Ludwig drums like Ringo, and a new redheaded kid arrived by the name of Richard Woodbury. His addition and a new name for the band (Prints of Darkness) gave the group a new style. Their repertoire expanded. September 1969: One addition to the personnel‚ÄîRoberta "Bourbon" Kilgore as vocalist. The Prints started writing their own tunes in earnest. On May 22, 1970, they played their last show and for the first time in three years, the instruments went in different directions afterwards. And so did the Prints. In the bands final year, several of their shows were recorded using a single open mic and a standard quarter-inch reel-to-reel tape recorder. The best tracks have been cleaned up and compiled for this release on Ravi Records, a label set up by music mail order company Metro Music. The release is a true labor of love, with no corners cut, and no expense spared on the sound restoration, mastering and packaging. The heavy-vinyl LP is housed in a super-deluxe gatefold sleeve modeled on the Stones "High Tide and Green Grass," complete with a lavishly illustrated and annotated booklet. Hand-numbered limited edition." - Ravi
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After nearly a decade of false starts, multiple game plans veering off the rails, and a handful of shattered hopes and/or dreams, the odyssey is finally complete—the new Fusetron site is here.

This is the first phase of a multipart rollout that will span the next few months: the currently browsable stock includes miscellaneous new releases from the past 8+ months (we have a lot of catching up to do), plus approximately a third of our backstock. Note that we’ve reduced/slashed prices on many titles and will continue to do so in order to make room for new stock. We’ll also be expanding / tweaking / improving / debugging the site itself (for example, we still have work to do on the automated international postage system, not to mention the inevitable inventory discrepancies that come with transferring an ancient and massive database to a new system).

Over the next few months, as we take inventory, clean house, and delve into our storage, we will be uploading thousands of additional items, gradually, on a near-daily basis. This will include the majority of the LPs, as well as many titles, in all formats, once thought long-gone. Many currently “sold out” items are likely to resurface.

Finally, once our general backstock is up (probably in the next two or three months) we’ll begin making our extensive stockpile of rarities available online for the first time: tons of random out-of-print titles, "deadstock," warehouse finds, secondhand collectibles, etc., accumulated over the past few decades.

Frequent/returning customers will be getting early access to these items. Details to follow on how this will work (a priority mailing list? a 'frequent flyer'-like program?), but it will not be based on dollars spent. We want to reward those who consistently support us, especially in the discogs marketplace era (to those who show up trying to poach five copies of a one-off rarity, and nothing else, ever… ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ ).

So—we suggest you take some time to dig through the site—even we’ve been surprised by what’s been turning up, and there’s much more to come.
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