Unseen Worlds

STONE, CARL - Electronic Music from the Seventies and Eighties

_¢‚Ǩ_ìThis 3LP set contains a selection of seven early works by American composer Carl Stone, all previously unpublished except for _¢‚Ǩ_ìShing Kee,_¢‚Ǩ¬ù which appeared on the 1992 New Albion CD release, Moms. Notorious, formerly elusive recordings like "Sukothai," "Shibucho," and "Dong Il Jang" exemplify how Stone masterfully guided his art through the transition period when New Music exited the loft scene of the 1970s for a stab at commercial presence in the 1980s, satisfying both impulses by fusing his compositional ambition with systems of live performance that were simultaneously pop savvy, commercial suicide, and technologically and aesthetically forward thinking. His live performance practice, documented here in a carefully restored archival recording of _¢‚Ǩ_ìKuk Il Kwan_¢‚Ǩ¬ù at The Kitchen in 1981, has merged seamlessly with todays computer-driven methods. The earliest works of this collection, _¢‚Ǩ_ìLIM_¢‚Ǩ¬ù and _¢‚Ǩ_ìChao Praya,_¢‚Ǩ¬ù realized on the Buchla 200, date to the early 1970s while Stone was a student of James Tenney and Morton Subotnick at CalArts, a rare glimpse of Stone working with purely electronic source material. Liner notes by Carl Stone, Jonathan Gold, Richard Gehr, and Marc Weidenbaum accompany on a gatefold sleeve. Download card is included with a digital-only bonus track, _¢‚Ǩ_ìUnthaitled_¢‚Ǩ¬ù from 1978. Mastered and cut by Rashad Becker._¢‚Ǩ¬ù - Unseen Worlds.

\r\n\r\n"Of the serious composers to come out of 1980s California, Carl Stone is the one who has always performed in nightclubs as well as concert halls, for spiky-haired punks as well as the Ph.D-and-ponytail set _¢‚Ǩ‚Äú his brand of electro-acoustic bricolage was probably better known among jazz musicians than it was to the blue-haired Monday Evening Concerts crowd." - Jonathan Gold, from the liner notes.
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After nearly a decade of false starts, multiple game plans veering off the rails, and a handful of shattered hopes and/or dreams, the odyssey is finally complete—the new Fusetron site is here.

This is the first phase of a multipart rollout that will span the next few months: the currently browsable stock includes miscellaneous new releases from the past 8+ months (we have a lot of catching up to do), plus approximately a third of our backstock. Note that we’ve reduced/slashed prices on many titles and will continue to do so in order to make room for new stock. We’ll also be expanding / tweaking / improving / debugging the site itself (for example, we still have work to do on the automated international postage system, not to mention the inevitable inventory discrepancies that come with transferring an ancient and massive database to a new system).

Over the next few months, as we take inventory, clean house, and delve into our storage, we will be uploading thousands of additional items, gradually, on a near-daily basis. This will include the majority of the LPs, as well as many titles, in all formats, once thought long-gone. Many currently “sold out” items are likely to resurface.

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