Souffle Continu Records

BELLAICHE, ALAIN - Sea Fluorescent

"Souffle Continu Records present the first ever reissue of Alain Bellaïche's Sea Fluorescent, originally released in 1976. Frenchman who is on the return from the USA is something unusual. Everything seemed to start out well for Alain Bellaïche: Born in Tunis, childhood in Cannes, studies at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris, his first folk concerts folk in youngsters' houses and clubs where everyone was well behaved... Then, in 1973, he left for the States. Bellaïche would settle for around ten years, with, as a soundtrack, the two albums that he would record there. Metropolitain (1974), which was the fruit of his collaboration with the Heldon guitarist Alain Renaud, and Sea Fluorescent. In the catalog of Asylum, David Geffen's first label, Bellaïche's music was listed alongside that of the Byrds, Tom Waits, Joni Mitchell, and Bob Dylan. In a Rock & Folk interview, Bellaïche expressed his regrets as to the prudence of French musicians: "I never had a group... perhaps the guys here are not motivated to play this kind of music." It's of note that the influences of the expatriate were, for example, Led Zeppelin, John McLaughlin, Weather Report, Herbie Hancock, The Spencer Davis Group... Bellaïche, a multi-faceted and iconoclastic musician, composed Sea Fluorescent just following his desires: from a cosmic ballad ("St Andrea"), to West Coast funk ("California"), dreamlike Spanish influences ("Spanish Roots"), optimistic blues ("Foolin' Myself"), a solar track ("I'm Angry", "Sun Blues"). And the Frenchman was in good company: Jean-Marie Fabiano (from Fabiano Orchestra) on percussion, Jerry Mahavishnu Goodman on violin on "Got My Place In That Country" or John Hicks whose cascades of notes bring reggae and western closer to the "reassembled" jazz that the pianist was playing at the time. A highly sought-after French jazz funk fusion nugget. Remastered from the master tapes. Licensed from Alain Bellaïche." - Souffle Continu Records .
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  • Regular price $24.00


After nearly a decade of false starts, multiple game plans veering off the rails, and a handful of shattered hopes and/or dreams, the odyssey is finally complete—the new Fusetron site is here.

This is the first phase of a multipart rollout that will span the next few months: the currently browsable stock includes miscellaneous new releases from the past 8+ months (we have a lot of catching up to do), plus approximately a third of our backstock. Note that we’ve reduced/slashed prices on many titles and will continue to do so in order to make room for new stock. We’ll also be expanding / tweaking / improving / debugging the site itself (for example, we still have work to do on the automated international postage system, not to mention the inevitable inventory discrepancies that come with transferring an ancient and massive database to a new system).

Over the next few months, as we take inventory, clean house, and delve into our storage, we will be uploading thousands of additional items, gradually, on a near-daily basis. This will include the majority of the LPs, as well as many titles, in all formats, once thought long-gone. Many currently “sold out” items are likely to resurface.

Finally, once our general backstock is up (probably in the next two or three months) we’ll begin making our extensive stockpile of rarities available online for the first time: tons of random out-of-print titles, "deadstock," warehouse finds, secondhand collectibles, etc., accumulated over the past few decades.

Frequent/returning customers will be getting early access to these items. Details to follow on how this will work (a priority mailing list? a 'frequent flyer'-like program?), but it will not be based on dollars spent. We want to reward those who consistently support us, especially in the discogs marketplace era (to those who show up trying to poach five copies of a one-off rarity, and nothing else, ever… ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ ).

So—we suggest you take some time to dig through the site—even we’ve been surprised by what’s been turning up, and there’s much more to come.
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